Deck The Halls

If you’ve decorated for the holiday season, I hope everything is still intact! I try to keep our decorations to a minimum. It’s really just an excuse to put out more animal “stuff.” I hope you enjoy the Christmas items I’ve collected over the years.

Part of me is glad the cats don’t play with this because of the noisy bells 😉

Here’s our pet stockings and photo ornaments.

 

Here’s the top of the bookcase with ornaments and a photo of Zinger with Santa. The wood carvings are from the Dog Bark Park Inn.

 

Our cute “cookie” jar made by Scentsy

 

My attempt at a photo Christmas Wreath

 

Petsmart Christmas Cat

 

Two days after putting up decorations, I found a stocking on the ground…

 

…Looks like a house cat is sending a message to the Barn Cats!

Giving Thanks

I hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving with friends and family (2 and 4 legged). This year I have a lot to be thankful for:

Benny on the front porch

  • Our barn cat Benny returned after disappearing for a week. Lucky for us, he only needed to spend 3 nights inside. I wanted to be confident he didn’t have any health issues that needed monitoring. During his indoor stay, he made himself at home laying on my neck and face. This inspired the nickname “Neck Scarf.”
  • All of our animals are happy, healthy, and have only minor behavioral issues. For example: Benny chews on blankets, Marley whines when she wants to go for a run while I drive the ATV, and Tully makes coyote noises during the night).
  • Everyone has warm beds. The barn cats have insulated beds and heat lamp in the barn cat condo. The house cats have the pellet stove to sleep in front.
  • Tully has made a drastic transformation this past year, going from barn cat to house cat. He purrs when I pick him up, lets me smother him with love, and hangs out on the couch with my husband.
  • The best part is that I have an awesome husband to share this with! He loves animals as much as I do, sometimes spoiling them more than me 😉

Benny and Danny wanting inside

Dog Ramp 3.0

We redesigned the ramp support to be sturdier and to be lower than the door threshold, replaced the OSB with 3/4″ plywood, and added caps to the posts. I then painted the guard rails and plywood to match the house trim.

Finished!

We used a paint additive made from finely ground walnut shells to create traction for dogs and humans.

Change Of Plans

I am disappointed to announce that I will no longer be a part of Golden Bond Rescue of Oregon. I have been greatly mistreated by a board member regarding a document not being submitted while I was being treated for a serious medical issue. This person was made aware of my situation yet she doubled down and spread lies to support her actions. After making others aware of this disturbing event, I was then painted as the problem person even though the injustice was done to me.

I have learned that people within the rescue, whether they have a title or not, have lost perspective. They believe they can treat people poorly in the name of helping the dogs. They believe that shining light on a problem, only makes the organization look bad and this is abhorrent; they would rather pretend a problem doesn’t exist.

I tried to find a way to continue to help the rescue dogs while standing up for myself, but that wasn’t possible. I respect myself too much to surround myself with people who won’t support me when I’ve been wronged. I don’t want to be around people who want to silence and control me for trying to bring about positive change and accountability.

I am greatly concerned that this sort of behavior will be found within other rescues because people focus so much on the animals and stop caring about the people involved. I could be wrong, but I am choosing not to find out. I am not trying to discourage anyone from becoming a foster home or from participating in animal rescues. I want to make you aware of possible problems. Perhaps by reading this, you might put more thought in how you treat others or how you will respond if you are faced with a similar problem.

Hopefully volunteers within animal rescues will learn something from my negative experience. Show some understanding to the humans who are sacrificing their time, energy and money for your shared cause. Show some respect for what they are able and willing to do, even if they don’t do as much as you do or as fast as you. Consider the consequences of not having them such as losing a foster home, financial donations, and event volunteers.

It’s possible to help animals without harming human relationships.

 

The Truth Hurts

This is a more serious posting that will may shock/sicken/sadden/disgust you but hopefully open your eyes to what is happening to beloved dogs in this country.

OF DOGS AND MEN (click HERE) explores a disturbing trend in American law enforcement: the shooting of pet dogs. This is common enough to be named Puppycide and have a database (click HERE). From SWAT raids to simple calls and even visits to wrong addresses, we are seeing more and more incidents of officers using lethal force against a family pet they deem a threat. Are these rash reactions by officers in a system with little regard for our four-legged family members, or are they true peace officers doing their best in a dangerous job? OF DOGS AND MEN investigates the issue from all angles, interviewing law enforcement officers and experts, and taking a journey with pet owners through the tragedy of loss and pursuit of change in a legal system in which the very officers they challenge are an integral part.

This is a huge problem for all dog owners not just those “breaking the law.” You may just live in a neighborhood where there was a burglar, your home alarm system was accidentally triggered, or noise complaint. Don’t fool yourself into believing these are isolated incidents.

Hopefully you will take in this data (click here).

Slow Motion Animals

This week I took our cat Borgia to Frontier Veterinary Hospital for a recheck appointment. Her mouth looked great after having some dental work done a couple months ago.

While chatting with our awesome vet Dr. Palmer, she mentioned watching a video of a dog drinking in super slow motion. I was eager to see this video so I tracked it down and wanted to share it with you.

Now that I’ve seen a dog drinking, what about a cat?

Internet wins! Youtube sucked me into watching more slow-motion animal videos.

Dog Ramp Version 2.0

Our awesome dog ramp (inspired by the arrival of new foster dog on Saturday) wasn’t complete when you last saw it. The two major issues were: 1) No railings; we had to guide Watson up and down the ramp so he didn’t step off the sides, and 2) The ramp wasn’t secured to anything, so it was able to slide a bit when we hoomans walked out the back door. These issues have been resolved and EVERYONE is pleased with the finished product!

Railings prevent animals from falling off ramp or trying to jump up and off the sides.

The ramp isn’t going to move with two 65 pound pier blocks, and our good friend Mr. Gravity, weighing it down. At some point the ramp will get painted and the OSB will get replaced with nicer, sturdier wood. I’m more than happy with how this project turned out. Watson hasn’t limped once since he started using the ramp!

The heavy pier blocks (one on each side of ramp) are attached to the ramp and are heavy enough to prevent the ramp from sliding.

This project is very dear to me, and I even cried when it was finished. This ramp is what I had imagined building for our boy Rusty who was starting to have some mobility issues. I brought up the idea to my husband when we went out for breakfast.  When we got home I discovered the massive growth on his head (two weeks later we ended his suffering). Click HERE for Rusty’s story.

I hope this ramp will inspire others to evaluate their dog’s mobility. Do what you can to make your dog more comfortable and get around easier. Something as simple as a ramp can do wonders for an old dog’s quality of life!