Tragic News

Today I got an Edna update. The day Edna was adopted, she broke her leg getting out of the car. The vet discovered that along with the broken leg, Edna had a spinal break and bone cancer. With tears running down my face, I wanted you to know that Edna was euthanized to end her suffering.

I promised her a happy ending…

This is now one of the saddest photos I have taken

 

Moving Day

I am happy to announce that Edna was adopted today. We met Edna’s new mom at a park in McMinnville, OR this afternoon. After introductions were made, we shared a lot of Edna’s important information and answered any questions. We followed Golden Bond’s rule of separating potential adopter from the foster dog for one hour (when the 2 parties live far apart, otherwise it’s 24 hours) before going through with the adoption. This time apart gives both parties a better chance to make more sound decisions, not one based solely on emotions because the cute dog is giving you “the look.”

When the hour was up, we made the adoption official. Papers signed, payment collected, harnesses and tags swapped, and I helped fit Edna’s new harness and Gentle Leader. At the end, Edna got into her new vehicle where we said our goodbyes. As sad as it is to let Edna go, we know she is going to a great home with someone who will treat her as a family member and give her the love and attention she desires.

Thank you Edna for being a sweet, quiet girl. Thank you Edna’s mom for giving Edna a home to call her own. I’m sure you will give Edna the best years of her life. Enjoy your time together.

  

Enjoy The Simple Things

Cooper hanging out on garage roof

 

There is something special about cats being outdoors. Perhaps it’s seeing them in a different environment or how quickly they come and go. I get a big smile when I see a Roof-Kitteh, no matter which cat is looking down on me. On occasion, I will walk out our back door and hear someone calling out but I don’t see anyone. I then look up and see a face peeking over the edge of the gutters. There’s been a handful of times that a Roof-Kitteh caught me off guard and got my adrenaline going.

The sweetest thing witnessed was a less confident cat up on the roof trying to figure out how to get down. He was pacing and talking while another cat was on the ground waiting. The cat on the ground decided to get on the roof with the other cat and then demonstrate how to get down. Next thing you know, both cats are back on the ground.

 

Benny Boots

I have heard stories about cats being stuck in trees, even cartoons show firemen rescuing scared kittehs. Never did I imagine that I would witness my own cat being rescued.

A couple years ago, my husband returned from walking our dogs to notify me that our smallest barn cat, Benny, was up in a tree by our barn. This wasn’t a small tree,  and he was at least 50′ up and no where near the top of that tree (imagine a tree in a forest).  The other barn cats were hanging out around the tree for moral support and I did what I could do for the little guy. I hung out by this tree talking to him. I brought down a bowl of his kibble, then canned wet food. I had other tasks to handle, so I decided to leave the area in hopes he would come down if I wasn’t present.

Keep in mind, this is a semi-feral barn cat. He’s skittish but still seeks out attention when it suits him. That evening I stepped outside our front door to listen for him. Each time I went outside I heard him crying out, and it broke my heart. On the second day I discovered some neighbor walking his German Shepherd off-leash on the property next to ours. The owner made a comment about seeing the cat yesterday and I made the assumption that his dog scared our cat up the tree. This data made the situation even more serious. If the dog is what Benny was scared of, and it’s coming around daily, Benny wasn’t likely to calm down enough to make it down the tree.

Unfortunately Benny picked a tree that didn’t have low branches that he could easily jump down on. He would have to go STRAIGHT down. He was also up way too high for any of our huge ladders. Benny stayed another night up in that tree. Thankfully the windstorm didn’t cause him to fall.

On day 3 I decided to contact a logger who we’ve done business with to see if he’d be willing and able to rescue our boy. No luck, but he did offer another person who might be help us. He did say that in his line of work, he has discovered dead cats in trees (they don’t always come down on their own). It took two more calls to get a hold of a guy who had experience with rescuing cats from trees. For $60 he would come out in a couple hours and attempt to rescue our boy.

With spiked boots, he climbed the tree, grabbed Benny and lowered him back to the ground in a cat carrier. I am very thankful to him for rescuing our scared kitteh.

Anyone wondering why the title of this blog post is “Benny Boots”? One day I was walking around our property and I was hearing Benny crying out. After spending a good ten minutes searching for him, my husband and I determined the noise was coming from my wet boots…they were squeaking. False alarm, no cat rescue needed.

Catering To The Kittehs

We have a situation in our house due to “special needs” animals. We have to put a baby gate in our bedroom doorway to keep the dogs out. Doing this helps with potty training our foster dogs.

Unfortunately this keeps out our cat Tully. Cats are built to jump, but somehow he never got the memo because he doesn’t like to jump. Tonight my husband decided to help our boy out by making a ramp that goes over the baby gate. Tully is now able to walk up the ramp and go spend countless hours on our bed sleeping. Hopefully our senior girl Borgia will take advantage of the ramp as she will likely develop arthritis.

Ramp still needs to be painted

From the husband: while I shake my head at a cat who doesn’t like to jump (he jumps on the bed to sleep all day, so what’s up Tully?), I built the ramps because the animals are our family. This task made me think of my boy Rusty, who loved sleeping in my spot on the bed but needed help getting on the bed in the last year of his life. I built him a table that was at the foot of our bed so he could use it as a step. He took to it immediately, and it warmed my heart to see him sleeping in my bed spot as he had done for years. It was his safe place, and the last place he laid. I miss you Rusty; please tell Tully he can jump.